Tuesday, April 13, 2010

A wander at dusk...

I think I love this place best in the late afternoons when the hills are shadowed and velvety and the sun sheds a special light before it finally disappears. On a stroll two evenings ago, we enjoyed these sights...
Our pumpkin haul...

Native violets... (scattered with grass thrown by the ride on mower)Our cutting. It's an old railway track and it forms the main drive into our place., and as we follow it, we see lots of...Tree ferns...

If we gave this place a name, I think it might have to be Tree Fern Cottage, although I don't think it's quite right as we've never gone ahead and named it. Funny thing -- I have all sorts of fun naming places in my books, but I can't quite get it right in real life.

I tried to take a pic of our guineas roosting. They look so cute, all six of them lined up on a branch in their pen, but if I get close enough to take a decent pic, they fly down looking for food.

5 comments:

2paw said...

What a lovely assortment of pictures!! Love the pumpkins and the flowers and what a country road you ahve to drive along!! We ahve manferns here. I expect I am politically incorrect but that's what we always called them. I don't tend to name my house and car, I never have. Our house when I was little was called Bella Vista!!!

Margaret Mayo said...

It looks gorgeous, Barbara.

Anne Gracie said...

Barbara, these are beautiful pictures. The mellow light of evening really gives a special glow -- I felt I was there. What a lovely place. And what fab pumpkins.

I love tree ferns. I have one at the kitchen window that just 'growed' there, and i'm not looking forward to the day when renovations will mean it's destroyed. It's not the cut off the top and replant type, but the rooted type. I will try to transplant it, but it's growing from half under the house and I don't feel optimistic.

Barbara Hannay said...

Alternatively, Anne, if you put layers of peat moss on the ground under the tree fern, spores (the brown dust under the fronds) may fall and start babies which would be much easier to transplant.

Anne Gracie said...

I'll try that, Barbara, thanks. I must admit, I'm very fond of this tree fern. And it's grown beautifully without any attention from me, through the last thirteen years of drought. Hopefully its spores will be just as tenacious.